TACTICAL IMPLEMENTATION AND RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN

Tactical Implementation Plan (TIP)

The tactical implementation plan incorporates work break down structure and Grant Chart (JISC infoNet, 2010). The TIP illustrates how Mari Jayne tries to fulfil the requirements of building up infrastructure. The components that make up the infrastructure include harvesting, processing, shipping, storage, and packaging.

Work break down structure (Michigan Office of Strategic Policy, 2010)

No. Task Period Responsible Resources Availed Signature
1 Harvesting Q2 JK Equipments, finance, labour
2 Processing Q2,Q3 PL Plant, labour,
3 Shipping Q3,Q4 MM Transport machinery e.g. lorries
4 Storage Q2, Q3, Q4 RZ Warehouses, storekeepers
5 Packaging Q3 RS Packaging plant, wrappers, labour

Gant Chart

Task Sub-task Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
Harvesting Purchasing tractors
Actual harvesting
Purchasing containers
Processing Processing process
Analysing steps followed
Quality control at the beginning (raw materials)
Quality control at the end (product)
Shipping Purchase of appropriate equipments
Records
Warehouses
Distribution channels
Storage Warehouses
Records; quantity, time
Maintenance
Pest & Pet control
Packaging Wrapping materials
Quality and quantity of products
Size of package

Milestones will be analysed at the end of each quarter and appropriate actions to determine the success and correction strategies formulated (Risk Management Basics, 2010).

Risk Management Plan

Risk Management Methodology

The entire project requires risk management process that is scalable to ensure that the type, level, visibility of risk management is commensurate with importance of the project and the risk (Microsoft TechNet, 2003).

Risk Identification

Some risks in carrying out the project include:

  • Quality of the seeds
  • Equipments and machinery failure
  • Incidents of fire, pollution and other environmental concerns
  • Availability of storage space
  • Availability of consumers
  • Human resource reliability and personal characteristics e.g. motivation

Assessing Probability

Since quantitative information is not available of the threat occurring, the assessment process will be based on common sense and experience (National Institute of Standards and Technology, 2002). This means that the assessment should be ongoing and evaluations of risks happening analysed periodically as the project proceeds, and thus, the likelihood of risks happening becomes clearer.

Assessing Impact

No Risk Impact
1 Quality of the seeds Medium
2 Equipments and machinery failure Low
3 Incidents of fire, pollution and other environmental concerns Medium
4 Availability of storage space Low
5 Availability of consumers Medium
6 Human resource reliability and personal characteristics e.g. motivation Low

Severity Calculation

No Risk Impact
1 Quality of the seeds Medium
2 Equipments and machinery failure Low
3 Incidents of fire, pollution and other environmental concerns Medium
4 Availability of storage space Low
5 Availability of consumers Medium
6 Human resource reliability and personal characteristics e.g. motivation Low

Contingency Plan

A contingency plan is applicable in those instances that something goes wrong at the time of the project. In the case of Mari Jayne project, the contingency plan will utilise three strategies, which are risk reduction, transfer and retention (Eslami, 2007).

  • Risk reduction – this involves employing strategies and methods that reduces the chance of risks occurring or reducing severity of risk if it may occur (Daft, 2007). The strategies that may be employed include maintaining the equipments, motivating and taking care of the employees, and ensuring policies and regulations are exclusively followed.
  • Risk transfer – this is the movement of risk from one party to a third party usually based on a contract. Thus, Mari Jayne will purchase insurance policy for the machine and staff, this will ensure the organisation resources will be maximised (Indiana University, 2003).
  • Risk retention – even though some risks can be transferred or reduced, other risks can be accepted as a necessary part of the project. Such risks include size of harvest, and efficiency of production process (Microsoft TechNet, 2003).

References

Daft, R. (2007). Management, 8th Ed. New York: Cengage Learning.

Eslami, M. (2007). Senior Design Experience: Lessons for Life, 2nd Ed. New York: Agile Press.

Indiana University. (2003). Business horizons, Volume 4. Indiana: Indiana University Graduate School of Business

JISC infoNet. (2010). Project Controls Database. Retrieved from http://www.jiscinfonet.ac.uk/infokits/project-management/project-controls-database

Microsoft TechNet. (2003). Creating a Risk and Contingency Plan. Retrieved from http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc759120%28WS.10%29.aspx

Michigan Office of Strategic Policy. (2010). Appendix D: IT Eighteen Month Tactical Plan. Retrieved from http://www.michigan.gov/documents/Appendix_D_91626_7.pdf

National Institute of Standards and Technology. (2002). Contingency Planning Guide for Information Technology Systems. Retrieved from http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-34/sp800-34.pdf

Risk Management Basics. (2010). Risk Management – Contingency, horizon, and action plans. Retrieved from http://www.risk-management-basics.com/risk-management-contingency,-horizon-and-action-plan.shtml

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