Social Problem: Unemployment

Social Problem: Unemployment

Introduction

Unemployment represents one of the major social problems that require anti-oppressive practices in order to address it. Just like all other forms of social justice oriented practice, unemployment has become problematic hence social workers need to demonstrate commitment to develop and implement effective practices to provide solutions to this problem (Mullaly & Mullaly, 2010). In this light, this essay will attempt to examine the practice implications of the linking of the private and the public as well as the personal and the political for unemployment. The idea of linking private and the public, as well as the personal and the political for unemployment has certain implications as discussed herein.

Implications at a personal level

Linking the private and the public has implications as far as the activity of addressing unemployment by social workers is concerned. First, it is important to realize that oppressive conditions, processes, and practices are present at personal, cultural, and structural levels. These oppressive situations are brought about by the interpersonal and psychological difficulties due to oppression with respect to material and political conditions. Thus, addressing this problem at a personal level requires social workers to focus on the social context in which exclusion of others from employment takes place (Mullaly & Mullaly, 2010).

Social workers also address unemployment as a social problem by including practices, such as intrapsychic and interpersonal processes, which involve introducing changes at the personal or individual level. In this case, social workers connect private feeling to the public and political while implementing social work practice by addressing unemployed individuals at a personal level before linking their feeling to the public. In addition, social workers are able to connect private feeling to the public and political through building personal intrapsychic strengths in an attempt to take action against oppression associated with unemployment. The practice implication of the social workers practice is raising awareness of injustice and oppression about unemployment making people to be in a better position to identify the social causes of unemployment. This, therefore, makes them less likely to blame themselves.

Moreover, the practice implication of linking the private and the public as well as the personal and the political for this social problem is connected with the understanding of the personal meaning of oppression by social workers. By approaching individuals at a personal level to address the challenge of unemployment, the social workers are able to question about a host of issues, such as race, gender, or sexual orientation to the unemployment problem they are facing. By asking those oppressed several questions social workers are likely to obtain their real feelings hence this can help them to connect private feelings (those of the unemployed people) to the public and political while implementing social work practice (Mullaly & Mullaly, 2010).

Practice implications of the linking of the private and the public

The social workers’ practice implication of linking of the private and the public one of the most effective ways through which social workers are able to connect private feelings to the public and political while implementing social work practice. In essence, social workers are able to understand the cultures of class, gender, race, and nation while implementing social work practice to unemployment as a social problem (Mullaly & Mullaly, 2010). Once this understanding has been attained, they are therefore being able to connect feelings from various individuals to the public and political hence urging for social justice.

The other practice implication of linking the private and the public as well as the personal and the political for unemployment is connected with the understanding how many groups are politicized. This provides a fundamental basis of a social movement in connecting private feelings of different cultural groups to the public and the political while implementing social work practice (Mullaly & Mullaly, 2010). For instance, a social movement advocating for employment equality are able to share private feelings of various individuals to the public and the political through the media and other activities. Another example is where feminist movements are likely to vent the private feelings to the private and political through demonstrating solidarity towards championing for the equality and justice of women at employment. The implication of this is massive changes in the existing employment practices to accommodate more women in the employment sector.

Another practice implication of linking private and the public as well as the personal and the political for unemployment is to address resistance to subordination, exploitation, and alienation of oppressed lot of individuals (Mullaly & Mullaly, 2010). In this case, resistance is considered an aspect of relations of power, which takes on local forms. By understanding that political and economic power rests among the dominant group, social workers are able to connect the feelings of the oppressed groups to the public.

Conclusion

In sum, the idea of linking private and the public, as well as the personal and the political for unemployment has certain implications. They include social workers are able to connect private feeling to the public and political through building personal intrapsychic strengths in an attempt to take action against oppression associated with unemployment, understand personal meaning of oppression by social workers, understand how many groups are politicized, and understand that political and economic power rests among the dominant group. Thus, social workers are able to connect the feelings of the oppressed groups to the public.

Reference

Mullaly, R. P., & Mullaly, R. P. (2010). Challenging oppression and confronting privilege: A critical social work approach (2nd ed.). Don Mills, Ontario: Oxford University Press.

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